"I have been finding your website very helpful and find myself checking back often! As I was walking by my lily bed I happend to notice that the bottom of one of my plants was yellow, with a closer look!!! I said to myself "yep, that looks like those bugs I saw on Christine's website" The Red Lily Leaf Beetle ): 

I wish that I would have known about your site sooner... I have been fighting with Japanese Beetle's that infested what once was a big beautiful Ash tree! I had been thinking that it's death was a because of the Japanese Beetle's that I have been trying to get rid of for 3 years now but the symptoms seem to be pointing to the Emerald Ash Borer, which I have not even seen on the tree!!! Could it have been a combo of the two bugs? Is the Emerald Ash Borer even in the Upstate area and if so is there a certain way we must dispose of the tree so that awe do not cause more problems?"  Sarah
If it was just Japanese beetles I would suggest an application of Milky Spore around her lawn but I was immediately concerned that she was dealing with the Emerald ash borer and wrote her to look for certain signs that I list later.   A year ago I noticed all these purple boxes hanging in trees across New York and Vermont and when I looked it up I saw a picture of these guys! (See below.)
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They are native to "China, Mongolia, North Korea, South Korea, Japan, Taiwan, and the Russian Far East" and are spreading across America killing our ash trees.  If you have an infected tree it is recommended to contact the US Dept.  of Agriculture and to only use dead trees for chipping, burial or burning.  Do not store over the winter and do not transport as wood.  Here is a link with phone numbers and information about EAB from the US Dept of Agriculture: HERE.  A great article from the site is posted below (which also has phone numbers) just click for larger size!
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The ash tree is the only tree affected by EAB.  Tell tell signs are woodpecker damage to tree, D shaped holes along the trunk (where it exits), bark splitting and if you open the bark where it split you can see S shaped tunnels on the tree where the larvae feed (see below). This causes the tree great damage and eventually kills it.  
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I posted a picture of the ash tree below so you can identify it.  
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The picture below is of the purple traps that you might see on ash tress.  On the inside wall is oil from the Manuka tree which traps the pest and so we can track them.  14 states have this pest killing ash trees and fire wood transport has been placed under quarantine in many areas due to EAB.  EAB are aggressive and can kill an ash tree in 2-3 years.  "If it is not contained and managed, the impact of emerald ash borer beetle in North America will be similar to that of the devastation caused by two fungal diseases, Chestnut blight and Dutch elm disease, which destroyed dominant species of woodland and urban forests in the 20th century."  
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Thank-You Sarah for writing tome about this so I could have the opportunity to inform people about this pest!